How to maintain your hair in a RV.

I know a lot of people may be wondering how the upkeep must be on maintaining healthy hair in such a small space. I’m here to tell you it is definitely possible and it’s just like living in a house. My hair regiment is very simple and I make most of my own hair products. I find the hair products found in most stores are costly and have too many chemicals that dry out my hair and leave it feeling horrible. Not only am I able to maintain my hair, but also my daughter’s hair as well. I will share some really simple tips to keep your hair healthy and beautiful in a RV.

First, set how often you need to shampoo your hair. For me and my daughter’s hair it is every two weeks. I make my own shampoo that leaves our hair feeling soft and moisturized after the wash. The shampoo I use includes raw African black soap and essential oils. It also has a fresh scent which adds a great benefit after shampooing your hair. I use a recyclable glass container which is less harsh on the environment to store it. Also, consider where you wash your hair. We clean the kitchen sink and wash our hair in it. It is just easier to do and it keeps the soap out of our eyes. Everyone has their own preference and that is ok. The only thing to really consider is if the shower or kitchen sink works for you and your method of camping. Generally we use RV parks so we always have access to dump stations and water at all times. Another suggestion if you don’t want to use all your water is use the bath house at the campground. You can use all the water you want and don’t have to walk far from your RV.

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Next, after shampooing I am most concerned about retaining moisture so I use a deep conditioner to stimulate my roots and leave my hair feeling soft and light. I use a plastic cap to seal my hair after twenty minutes and wrap it in a towel to trap in heat. I also have a portable steamer which you can find on Amazon. It works and the parts breaks down which makes it really easy to store in a tiny space. It leaves your hair feeling amazing after sitting under the steamer for at least twenty minutes. I also used this on my four year old who can’t get enough of it.

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Finally, I twist my hair as a protective style. There are a few reasons why I twist my hair in between styles. It is a way to manipulate my hair less so that it can grow. It also keeps my hair moisturized in between washes which helps retain length. I make a twist butter that is creamy and easy to apply that keeps my hair smelling good and healthy in between washes. It is a multipurpose product so you can use it on your body as well for the same results. This product is made with organic raw shea butter, essential oils, plus a few more oils to keep you hair shining and growing. I hope this helps and good luck on your hair journey while traveling!

I also have a Youtube video on the shampooing process for more information. Link: “How to maintain your hair in a RV”

 

 

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Six steps on how to recover from being homesick when traveling full time.

Traveling isn’t always glamorous and can get a little redundant just like normal life in a house.

Traveling isn’t also a quick fix to the issues you experience internally (for ex. anxiety or depression). There is an adjustment period when traveling that most people don’t discuss, but sometimes the feeling of being homesick creeps in and you want to go back to a familiar place. 

Beginning stage: Prepare for your journey by researching the culture.

Ensure you are ready for your journey and new environment because it will take some getting used to. You can never fully be ready for the unknown but leave some room mentally that things may not look or feel the way you imagined it in your head.

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Initial happiness: In the beginning, you will feel pure bliss from traveling and seeing new places.

Just know the blissful feeling will wear off. Once it wears off you need to remind yourself why you are living the lifestyle and try to do some new things to mix it up. You may even need to touch ground in your home base to reconnect with some family and friends and that is ok. (using Skype or a digital means to talk to a familiar face is also a useful tool)

Frustration: If and when the blissful feeling wears off you will get annoyed by your new living arrangement.

Everything is different and unfamiliar, so you will need to check in with yourself or a close friend to stay connected to the reason you are traveling. There may be some stores that aren’t easily available such as Walmart or Chipotle. You may not be able to run to the store to get a hair product like you would at home and feel that you just want to be done with the new place you are visiting. These feelings are completely normal and please hang in there it will get better.

Adjustment: You get used to the new customs and culture of your new home.

You find it less of a challenge to adjust to the new environment around you and start to settle in. At this point, you may want to find a part time job or a community event to meet the locals. Find a comfortable routine that works with your schedule. After some time you should begin to feel like you are adjusting well with the new culture.

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Adaptation: Troubles don’t last always.

Once you begin feeling comfortable with the culture, you will start to feel a sense of biculturalism, where you identify and even like the new culture you are experiencing. Everything that was once foreign and odd to you now feels comfortable and normal. You may even meet a few friends to include in your site seeing. A suggestion would be  to learn the native language or try some different foods in your area.

Re-entry: Going home.

When you leave this foreign culture to return home, you may find that you go through these stages all over again. It is no place like home. Having a homestead or home base is a essential part of traveling and takes the ease off of feeling homesick. It also gives the opportunity to reconnect with family and friends. This is normal and healthy way to enjoy life on the road.

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Black history in the city of Savannah

I don’t pretend to be an expert on Savannah’s culture or history in the least amount. I do want to share my experience on this trip as it brought a new perspective that I didn’t quite get before in my past experience traveling here. Immediately you’re swept up in the wonderful choices of food, the accessibility to openly carrying alcohol on the street, the huge ferries, but most of all the black history here is phenomenal. If you want to dive into black history and learn more about the culture while you’re in Savannah it is quite easy and possible.

RAILROAD MUSEUM

We visited the Railroad Museum for the first time and there was an exponential amount of information on black history. Blacks helped build the railroads and lived near where they worked which back then would be considered a plantation. After the Civil War, the Jim Crow laws were in effect so they had their own separate showers and bathrooms, and made a significant amount less than their white peers. Their labor was enforced by the government which means they couldn’t leave and if they tried there would be people looking for them.

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MARITIME SHIPS MUSEUM

West Broad Street School piece of history was inside the Maritime Ships Museum. This school was a very important part of education in black history. During the 1860’s laws were implemented to lower the funding of black education. West Broad Street school accepted black girls and boys during 1873-1962. They were instructed to build ships as apart of their education. There was one teacher for each of the eight grades which by the 20th century included a school average of 600-800 children. The black children with less resources and access to teachers excelled and were more advanced than their white counterparts; this prompted whites to cut funding for the school to lower the quality of the black students it was producing.

RIVERWALK

If you ever get around to visiting the river walk you will notice a monument in the Square of a black family with chains around their feet representing emancipation. It was the first monument in Savannah to represent contributions made by African Americans.  There is a quote by  Maya Angelou that reads. “We were stolen, sold and bought together from the African continent. We got on the slave ships together. We lay back to belly in the holds of the slave ships in each others excrement and urine together, sometimes died together, and our lifeless bodies thrown overboard together. Today, we are standing up together, with faith and even some joy.” What I understood her quote to mean is that through the suffering, slavery, and persecution, African American still found a way to stand.

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The history I mentioned is not even close to all the information available in this city. It is definitely a learning opportunity for children as well as adults to expand knowledge on black history. The reason for traveling is not only to eat, go to the beach, and sleep in, but to dive into culture, experience, and live. Learning the history of the cities we are visiting not only expands our knowledge, but gives us a sense of appreciation for the people before us.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

 

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